Close to 75,000 Canadian healthcare workers are occupationally exposed to antineoplastic agents.1

Providing life-saving treatments can put your staff at risk

Over 52% of these workers are pharmacy staff—pharmacists, technicians and assistants.1
Nurses, physician specialists and cleaning workers are also at risk of exposure.1
The risks to their health are real and significant.

Detrimental effect on DNA

Pharmacists and nurses who handle antineoplastic drugs show a 2.5-fold increase in total chromosomal aberrations (CAs), with up to a 5-fold increase in certain CA types2,3

Increased rates of cancer

This includes relative risk of leukemia increases for oncology nurses,4 a 2.8-times increase in non-melanoma skin cancer and a 3.7-times increase in non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in pharmacy techs5

Damage to internal organs

Three consecutive head nurses handling cytostatic agents over time had liver damage6

Reproductive issues

Double the risk of miscarriage among staff handling antineoplastic drugs, along with an increase in risk of malformations in offspring7,8

Exposure can occur any point in the journey of a hazardous drug in your facility

A Canadian study of six hospitals found that frequently contacted surfaces at every stage of the hospital medication system had measurable levels of antineoplastic drug contamination.2

The revolutionary BD® HD Check System has a convenient handheld design that enables testing for select HDs at any location. It provides reliable, easy-to-read results in less than 10 minutes, so you can take immediate corrective action and prevent HD residue from spreading. See how >

 
  1. Dock/pharmacy receiving and storage Dock/pharmacy receiving and storage
  2. Pharmacy compounding Pharmacy
    compounding
  3. Pharmacy verification Pharmacy
    verification
  4. Transport and storage in patient area Transport and storage in patient area
  5. Nurse administration Nurse
    administration
  6. Housekeeping Housekeeping


Every day, each HD travels through at least six departments in a facility, with dozens of hands touching it along the way.2 To learn about what this journey means to you and your health, watch the "Day in the Life of a Hazardous Drug" video

Unsafe surfaces and practices can increase the risk of hazardous drug exposure

Both NAPRA and USP <800> recommend sampling surfaces routinely to help improve environmental quality3,4
Yet a 2017 survey revealed that fewer than one in four U.S. hospitals practice environmental sampling.5 In a study of 36 Canadian hospitals, 47% of samples tested positive for cyclophosphamide, 18% for ifosfamide and 3% for methotrexate.6

We don’t know what a safe level of exposure is. And just like our radiation principles, we want to go as low as reasonably possible. Anything you can put into place that prevents you being exposed is going to be to your long-term benefit. […] From my perspective, the only right answer is no exposure. — Laureen Plommer, Clinical Educator for Systemic Therapy16
Negative results today do not mean that tomorrow will be safe. [...] I find the BD® HD Check System fast, easy and reliable to use. It takes about 10 minutes to set up the device initially. After that, it takes less than 10 minutes to process a sample. This is a significant improvement over traditional wipe sampling kits that may take up to two weeks or longer to give a result, during which time HD residue may be spread to other locations. — Fred Massoomi, RPh, PharmD, FASHP13

Ibus exped et ape

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Ibus exped et ape

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas vestibulum tortor quam.

Ibus exped et ape

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas vestibulum tortor quam.

Routine monitoring can significantly reduce contamination and even help to prevent it18,19


The BD® HD Check System can detect surface contamination for select HDs in less than 10 minutes

  • Easy-to-read results
  • Convenient handheld design
  • Track contamination levels over time
HD Check System

The BD® HD Check System currently tests for three commonly used HDs—cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and doxorubicin

Ibus exped et ape

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas vestibulum tortor quam.

And facilities like New York-Presbyterian/Queens are already seeing results

The advent of the BD® HD Check System raised the bar for HD detection and protection. [...] We do the test ourselves. We get results quickly. We can retest surfaces immediately. We pay less for each sample. — Alex Melchert, RPh, MS, Director of Pharmacy, New York-Presbyterian/Queens16

Together, let’s keep hazardous drug surface contamination in check

Stay informed about the latest in HD detection

NAPRA: National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities
USP: United States Pharmacopeia

References

1. CAREX Canada. Antineoplastic Agents Occupational Exposures. Accessed on May 19, 2021, at http://www.carexcanada.ca/profile/antineoplastic_agents-occupational-exposures
2. Hon CY, Teschke K, Chu W, Demers P, Venners S. Antineoplastic drug contamination of surfaces throughout the hospital medication system in Canadian hospitals. J Occup Environ Hyg.2013;10(7):374-83. doi: 10.1080/15459624.2013.789743
3. National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities (NAPRA). Model Standards for Pharmacy Compounding of Non-hazardous Sterile Preparations. Approved November 1, 2016. Accessed on May 19, 2021, at http://napra.ca/sites/default/files/2017-09/Mdl_Stnds_Pharmacy_Compounding_NonHazardous_Sterile_Preparations_Nov2016_Revised_b.pdf
4. United States Pharmacopeial Convention. USP General Chapter <800> Hazardous Drugs—Handling in Healthcare Settings. Accessed on May 20, 2021, at http://www.usp.org/compounding/general-chapterhazardous-drugs-handlinghealthcare
5. Heller A. On the Front Lines of Wipe Sampling. Pharmacy Technology Report. http://www.pharmacytechnologyreport.com/Article/PrintArticle?articleID=56059. Published October 16, 2019. Accessed January 29, 2020.
6. Berruyer M, Tanguay C, Caron NJ, Lefebvre M, Bussières JF. Multicenter Study of Environmental Contamination with Antineoplastic Drugs in 36 Canadian Hospitals: A 2013 Follow-up Study. J Occup Environ Hyg. 2015;12:2,87-94, doi: 10.1080/15459624.2014.949725


Digital Ad References

*Tests for select hazardous drugs. Surfaces with contamination at or above the limits of detection have 95% specificity and sensitivity.
†Kiffmeyer TK, Tuerk J, Hahn M, et al. Application and assessment of a regular environmental monitoring of the antineoplastic drug contamination level in pharmacies–the MEWIP project. Ann Occup Hyg. 2013;57(4):444-455. doi:10.1093/annhyg/mes081.
††National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities (NAPRA). Model Standards for Pharmacy Compounding of Non-hazardous Sterile Preparations. Approved November 1, 2016. Accessed on May 19, 2021, at http://napra.ca/sites/default/files/2017-09/Mdl_Stnds_Pharmacy_Compounding_NonHazardous_Sterile_Preparations_Nov2016_Revised_b.pdf.
^United States Pharmacopeial Convention. USP General Chapter 800> Hazardous Drugs—Handling in Healthcare Settings. Accessed on May 20, 2021, at http://www.usp.org/compounding/general-chapterhazardous-drugs-handlinghealthcare.
#CAREX Canada. Antineoplastic Agents Occupational Exposures. Accessed on May 19, 2021, at http://www.carexcanada.ca/profile/antineoplastic_agents-occupational-exposures.